Recipe: 6 Ingredients To A Better Sports Drink

Recipe: natural sports drink

Why are we still buying Sports Drinks?

Look on the label of your favorite Gatorade and you will see ingredients such as Water, Sugar, Dextrose, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor, Salt, Sodium Citrate, Monopotassium  Phosphate, Gum Arabic, Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate, Glycerol, Ester of Rosin, and Yellow 6… because… what sports drink shouldn’t be fluorescent Orange?

I first heard about making your own post run drink from Roger Banister’s book, The Four-Minute Mile, where he describes finishing a run at the local pub and dissolving a few salt tablets in his water in front of a very confused bartender.

Since then we have had many variations on the sports drink, from what could probably be called salt water to the notorious Gatorade itself. Unfortunately, the industrialization of products such as Gatorade and other sports drinks leads to this long list of otherwise non essential ingredients to make their product look artificially appetizing, as well as prolonging its shelf life.

Well, last week I had had enough and I decided I would try my hand at making my own sports drink, sans the bright Orange coloring… sorry. Continue reading “Recipe: 6 Ingredients To A Better Sports Drink”

Why “I don’t have time to exercise” is BULLSH*T! – Read this and get 30 minutes of your day back

I’m a fitness coach. Every single day I help clients reach their fitness goals. Can you guess the #1 excuse I get when people aren’t keeping up with their programs?

Yes, yes you can. You can because you use it too.

“But Chad, I don’t have time to exercise!”

BULLSHIT I say!

And here’s why… Continue reading “Why “I don’t have time to exercise” is BULLSH*T! – Read this and get 30 minutes of your day back”

How to get back on track after 2+ weeks off

25 minute home workout

Hello, my name is Chad Williams and I have a confession:

I haven’t worked out in over 2 weeks!

I know, I know, you’re probably thinking: “but wait, aren’t you supposed to be a coach?” “shouldn’t you be leading by example?” “how do you get other people to workout if you don’t do it yourself”.

Or, you might be thinking: “Thank god, he’s human too!”

It’s actually that last thought that is the reason for this post.

A lot of times I get comments from clients, or when I tell people what I do, that I’m some super human that works out 8 days a week and sleeps on a treadmill to keep my body in shape. There is an immediate higher standard that I get held to of persistent, consistent exercise habits that no other human being could possibly reach. It’s the standard of fitness coaches, trainers and athletes.

If you have that type of belief, then it’s a major reason you aren’t reaching your goals. You don’t think it’s possible. Let me help you change that belief…
Continue reading “How to get back on track after 2+ weeks off”

Is Your Workout All or Nothing

I work with a lot of clients who really struggle to be consistent with their workout routines. Actually, for MOST of my clients, the #1 thing we focus on in the beginning is developing their consistency. I’ve written about it recently.

A big struggle they have comes from a belief that seems very common.

I call it that All or Northing belief.

The basic principle is that my clients believe they need to be all or nothing. As in, when they workout, they need to do the whole workout, at 100% capacity for it to be worth it. Otherwise, what’s the point. There’s some level that they SHOULD be able to achieve and if they can’t then there’s no point.

Have you ever thought this?

You had a 60 minute workout planned, you only have 30 minutes so there’s no point. Right?

Many people think they need to do the program 100% to get results. They need to be able to get a personal best or put in their best efforts for it to be worthwhile.

If they’re sore, they need more rest.

If they don’t have enough time, they need to do it later.

Often, these are really just justifications for why you can’t do it now. The problem is that this creates negative habits that get harder and harder to overcome as time goes on. You get so used to putting it off that you really struggle to get up and do it when the time is right.

You end up doing nothing.

To get a different perspective, let’s do some simple math:

If you have three 60-minute workouts in a week and you do none of them, how much time have you spent working out?

Right, ZERO!

Now, if you have three 60-minute workouts in a week but you run out of time in each one and only do half, how much time have you spent working out?

Right, 90 minutes!

Now, go ask a 5th grader: which is bigger; 90 or 0?

Right, 90!!

My point here is that you’re going to be better off in the long run even if you only do half of your workouts. Half the time or even half the intensity. It’s not worthless if you can’t do the full thing.

JUST DO IT.

Besides, reduced capacity workouts are actually a great thing for your body and mind. It can help the muscles recover and you get a sense of accomplishment, not failure.

Doing 50% of a workout still feels like you at least did something.

Doing 0% of a workout feels shitty.

If you’ve ever run into this thought pattern, break it immediately by doing something. As I wrote recently , the perfect program is the one you’re doing. Stop thinking you need to do it all or nothing and just get out there and do what you can.

Have you ever done this? Share your experience in the comments below.

The Perfect Program

When you start a new fitness program, you probably want to know the best way to get the result you want right?

Of course!

It seems reasonable: You have a goal you want to reach, you’re not sure how to get it, so you ask if anyone can help you get there. Or maybe you do a google search.

The good news is that there’s a ton of options out there. The bad news is how do you know which one is right for you?

Which one is that perfect program?

Which one is going to get you the results you want the quickest?

Unfortunately, everything out there seems to claim it is the best: 6 minutes this, high intensity that, “The #1 secret you’ve been missing…”, “6 pack shortcuts” and “The ultimate fat burning program”.

If you follow their plan, you’ll look just like their models!

We’re taught to believe that the perfect program exists. And we’re taught to believe that the it’s the perfect program itself that will get us the results we want.

There is a little bit of truth in this. A good program that fits your needs is important, but that’s not usually the problem.

When I start coaching someone, the problem isn’t that they aren’t doing the RIGHT program, it’s that they aren’t doing ANY program. Or at least they can’t stick to any program for a reasonable amount of time.

Let’s say I create the perfect program for you. It targets everything you want to target and will get you all the results you want to get. Sounds pretty sweet right?

Now what if you don’t do that program?

If you’re not doing it it doesn’t matter how good the program is. It’s useless.

It doesn’t matter how perfect the program is, you’ll never get any results if it just sits there collecting dust.

For most people starting out, the perfect program is the one you’re actually doing. It’s the one that progresses you effectively, meets your needs, and helps you achieve success so you’re motivated to keep pushing yourself further.

That’s it. It’s that simple.

When you’re getting started in a workout routine, often it’s less about WHAT you’re doing and more about the fact that YOU’RE DOING IT.

Once you’ve built yourself to a point where you’re exercising consistently (3+ times per week for at least 6-12 months in a row) THEN you can become more concerned about the specifics of the program. At that point your body is adapting to the program you’re doing so you’ll need a smart, targeted plan to help you reach the next level.

When the level you’re trying to reach is Level 1, worry less about finding that perfect program and focus on just doing something.

Do you have experience with this? Share your story in the comments below.

– Chad

Head Fitness Coach and Founder

Internal motivation

I just finished a half marathon on Sunday!

Whew, I’m tired.

I’ve been training for the past 5 months and it’s not only been a killer workout but it’s also been great for internal motivation.

For years I’ve been working out with trainers and taking classes. They were all great but when it comes down to motivation, it’s the trainers are the ones holding the whip to get me moving, not me. I realized after some time that what I really needed was to count on myself to get my workouts done rather than show up and have someone yell at me until it was done.

Certainly sometimes I’ve needed a little extra help while training by myself (that’s when I called Chad) but I realized that the more I do it myself the more I CAN do it myself. I made myself a plan, I stuck with it and it resulted in me getting in shape for running a half marathon (thank you, thank you!). But most importantly it resulted in me knowing that I can do it on my own. I have internal motivation now to push myself and crack my own whip. It’s pretty incredible to know that I did it on my own, and not because someone else had the motivation and was telling me what to do!

Think it’s time to crack your own whip too? Where does your motivation come from?

 

Weekly Activity Challenge – Testing Week

Happy Monday!

The key focus to the weekly activity challenge is that each week you get a new activity to focus on to build your health and fitness. At Anthrophysique, we’re big on measurement and like to make sure all of our clients are getting results.

As I mentioned in the very first challenge, we’ll be testing our benchmarks workouts every 10 weeks. Believe it or not, it’s been 10 weeks!

benchmark workouts

The focus this week is to go through each one of the benchmark workouts to re-assess your fitness. FInd your old score and compare that to what you achieve this week. If you didn’t do the benchmark workouts last time, this will be your first chance to get a baseline. In 10 weeks you’ll be able to test it again!

Here are links to all the benchmarks:

Benchmark #1
Benchmark #2
Benchmark #3
Benchmark #4
Benchmark #5

Throughout the week, test each one of the benchmark workouts. Please post your results in the comments and let us know if you’ve improved or not!

Does Lifting Weights Make Women Bulky?

lifting weights

Women often wonder if lifting weights will make them get big bulky muscles. We always see men in the gym lifting weights and getting big, so doesn’t that mean women will have the same fate?

The problem isn’t the weights themselves that cause bulky muscles, but how the weights get used. Truth of the matter is that weights will help build some muscle, but this can be very beneficial even if your goals is weight loss.

If you want to avoid the big, bulky muscles and focus more on leaning or toning, there is a general rule you can follow:

Lighter weights for more reps.

Now be careful though because this isn’t always true for everyone. We all have different body types and metabolisms  It is however a pretty good general rule that you can at least try out. If you want to be sure or you’ve had the opposite experience, it can be really valuable to get some professional coaching advice.

If you have experience lifting weights, please comment and share your thoughts. If you’ve always avoided them, I encourage you to try them in your next workout and report back with your results. You might find that you love them!

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Weekly Activity Challenge – Benchmark #2

Weekly Activity Challenge - Benchmark #2

Welcome back to the weekly activity challenge! If you missed the announcement last week: for the next year (at least) I’ll be posting a weekly activity challenge on Monday’s. This will highlight some form of activity or workout you can do throughout the week to stay active. The challenges will vary from walking, to stationary holds, to workouts and other types of activities that we do naturally as human beings. You can try them every day if you’d like, but I’d recommend at least 3 times throughout the week.

Every activity challenge will follow a few key principles:

  • They can be done at home or outside.
  • They won’t require any specialized equipment, just things you can find at home.
  • They will be based on natural human movements and bodyweight exercises.
  • Should take less than 60 minutes to complete, most will be less than 30 minutes.
  • Can be done every day.

For the next 4 weeks, I will outlining out “Benchmark Challenges”. These are activity challenges that we will test every 10 weeks to see your improvement. In the next 4 weeks, you’ll be establishing your baselines to get a clear picture of where you’re starting from.

Today, I’m introducing Benchmark #2.

Weekly Activity Challenge – Benchmark #2:

3 sets for maximum time of:
1. Max plank hold; 1:00

Weekly Activity Challenge - Benchmark #2
NOT this kind of Planking!!

This means you’re going to get into a front plank and hold that position for as long as you can. It might be 10 seconds or 2 minutes, but hold it as long as possible. Then, rest 1:00 exactly before starting set 2. Repeat that for 3 total sets. The 1:00 rest is important for when we compare in the future. It keeps that variable consistent for comparison.

Try this workouts once per day if you can, or at least 3 times throughout the week. If you try it every single day, don’t be surprised if you’re score drops a little at first. This will be due to sore and tired muscles.

Please post your scores in the comments section for each time you do it. I also recommend a Workout Journal for your own records.

Have Fun!

*image from Google Image search: Planking

Stubborn Love

Blog # 18 ~The Jane Experiment

Great news! Major win: Plank record of 2:53! Yahoo!!

This week I continued to invent some of my own workouts and push myself with my planking. It feels amazing, like I’m not a victim to the gym to make me feel happy, healthy or fit!

This is totally something which is new for me even in the last few weeks. The consistency of holding out and pushing to my maximum everyday is helping me do that in many areas of my life where I would have been fearful before.

I have also been giving a lot of thought to supplements and all the focus that is put on ‘what we’re missing.’ Do you take supplements? Which kind? Do they really help? And how do we know if we’re getting everything we need? I often wonder if there are things in the health industry which play on what we’re missing, externally and internally, in order to sell us things or ideas. As I’ve been asking around for data and opinions it seems that almost everyone says or thinks something differently which brings me back to theory of figuring out whats best for us individually. For me it comes down to fitting it in, again consistently, and finding the balance of taking care of myself to live a healthy life, but not compromising living my life for it.

As I’ve been working on this ‘Experiment’ I’ve also been learning a lot about taking compliments. It has always been something I find rather odd, and uncomfortable. As I’ve been working with Chad on this experiment and working on my self image, I’ve been getting quite a bit of positive feedback on the changes I’ve made and how I look.
Now when I hear those compliments, I can see it’s something I’ve been building myself, and the recognition of that is amazing. I’m much less stubborn and against my own self love. It’s like now I chose to see the good in me as it helps move me toward my goals because I know how it works, this love and motivation.

Now that it’s time to re-evaluate my goals and objectives, Chad has given me his objectives questionnaire again and I’m excited to fill that out this week and see how things have changed for me.

How often do you re-evaluate your goals, in fitness or in life?

Have a great weekend!

Jane
xoxo