Trust the process – seeing the big picture

After launching our new Lifestyle Coaching service in late October last year, I’ve seen some great progress in the clients that have already signed up.

The service is completely built around seeing “the big picture” and of course developing a lifestyle of healthy habits. Right from day one we are thinking long term and not just short term.

The benefits have been better than I expected!

In my 6+ years of online coaching what I’ve seen is that Continue reading “Trust the process – seeing the big picture”

Making new year resolutions? Read this first! 

You just spent a bunch of time with family, enjoyed opening some new gifts and ate your weight in turkey, ham, potatos, stuffing and likely a few varieties of pie and/or cookies.

Now is the time we reflect on the year that passed, what we did and didn’t accomplish and what we want to do in the new year. For many, this includes fitness and health related goals.

If this is you, I have some questions that will hopefully trigger a new perspective for your goals in 2017.

Please read on:

First thought: 

What if I told you thath you WON’T reach your goal within the next year?

What if I told you it will take 5 years to reach your health goals?

Would you try?

Would you not even bother?

Would you stop reading this and try to find someone who will tell you differently?

I ask these questions specifically because it challenges our perspective on goals. Most of the time we think we can reach our goals within 3 months or even within a year. Especially health goals.

In my experience, that’s just not true and for many people it can take many years. But so what?

The key question is: do you plan on living for 5 more years?

I’m sure the answer is likely well beyond that.

So?

Let’s say you think you’ll live 30, 40 or 50 more years. And let’s say that in that time you never truly reach your health and fitness goals?

Is it still worth the effort of trying?

Do you think reaching 50%, 70% or 90% of your goal is worth the effort?

If it’s not, then don’t bother. If it is, then why ever stop?

I know this article has been mostly questions, but I encourage you to honestly answer them for yourself.

Whether you decide it’s worth it or whether you decide it’s not, you’ll be happier either way.

~ Chad

You know your goal, but are you missing the most important part?

Most people have a goal in mind when they start their fitness journey.

Some goals are super specific, others are more general, but you always have a target you want to reach.

However, what I see missing for a lot of people is a clear recognition of where they are starting from.

Let me explain with an analogy:  Continue reading “You know your goal, but are you missing the most important part?”

Life is now, why wait till January?

Why wait till January

Hello, I’m the newest Fitness Coach to join the dynamic team of AnthroPhysique. As this is my first blog post, I wanted to give you a quick intro and tell you how excited I am to be a part of this team! I feel so passionate about what I do, it’s amazing to be supported by like-minded people that are so talented in their profession. I hope you will read my bio to learn about me and what I do.

As 2017 is creeping up, I am reminded of my own fitness journey I began in March. In the last nine months my life has been filled with positivity more than ever before. While I owe much of that to fitness, it was also my desire to make a change that drove my results home. Many of us are creatures of habit, and while we may adapt to many of life’s arbitrary circumstances, we often neglect the real need to change.

 

Why wait till January
(left, pregnant 2014; middle, March ’16; right, Nov ’16)

I’m not sure why we wait until unfortunate events take place to adjust our forward-thinking. I compare it to being in a dysfunctional relationship and waiting for the other person to breakup so you don’t have to be the asshole. You both know it isn’t working, why drag it out?

Our lives are constantly going through an ebb-and-flow, there is no better time than the present to take initiative. In my own life, I hid behind my anxiety. I thought that if I avoided confrontation, or let opportunities pass, I was simply just missing out on that one thing — but I couldn’t have been more narrow-minded. When we limit ourselves from things we fear, our inaction replaces experiences, passion, and most of all, living. Life is now, why wait until January to start working towards your goals?

These are a few of my philosophies. Take advantage of today, because if you start today, you won’t regret it tomorrow.

Well I guess for my first post we just jumped right into things here didn’t we?!?

Wishing you a safe, healthy, and happy holiday!

~ Alice

To follow more of my day and lifestyle, check out my Instagram.

Do your short term actions match your long term goals?

What’s your long term vision of your health?

Do you want to be healthy for the next week? 3 months? 12 months? 3 years? 50 years?

Seriously, this is no joke.

When I ask people this question, most people answer in the 50+ range or “the rest of my life”.

Like it’s a no brainer.

However, their short term actions don’t match their long term goals.

They are only focused on a short term goal, and if they don’t see results within weeks “it’s not working” and they give up.

Sound familiar?

People want long term results but only have a short term plan.

Do me a favor: comment below with your 3 month, 12 month, 36 month and 30+ year vision of your health.

Then let me know if that activity has changed your perspecitve.

~ Chad

The Struggle is Real!

Ever seen an Instagram post or Tweet talking about “the struggle is real”?

It often seems like it’s a way to say “oh, look at how hard this is for me”. Or maybe it’s just an excuse as to why they aren’t succeeding.

Either way it seems like it’s a bad thing that there is a struggle.

And to be honest, that used to be me. I hated the struggle.

However, over the past year or two, I’ve taken a new perspective on the struggle: Continue reading “The Struggle is Real!”

Let’s Talk About The Warm Up; Are You Doing It Right?

typical pre run warm up

What’s a typical pre-run warm up routine for you?

For the longest time I would just walk out the door, do some leg swings – if that – and go on my way.

That was the routine!

However I know better now; the point of this pre run dynamic routine is to thoroughly warm up your running muscles and be ready to get into your run. So instead of taking 5 minutes to find yourself during the run you can warm up more efficiently and save yourself the pain of potential injury.

The more you warm up your hips, glutes and hamstrings the less stress you are putting on a cold muscle during the run.

You are essentially activating that muscle to fire properly so that your stride will benefit!

Check out the video below for a sample of my “A Day In The Life Video” series I’ve been working on. If you want, you can jump ahead to the 3:44 mark where I go through my warm up, touching on my glutes, hips, hamstrings and quads – to make sure that I am ready to go when I hit the road.

 

 

If you watched the whole thing, I hope you enjoyed the video!

Now let’s talk. Comment below about your warm up routine, or lack of and I’d love to see if I can help!

Also, don’t hesitate to reach out to me on Instagram and Twitter if you have any other run-related questions.

Justin

The Time Will Pass Anyway

I’ve had this as my email signature for years:

“Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.”

~ Earl Nightingale

I was thinking about this quote yesterday because it was my 1 year anniversary of moving to Guadalajara Mexico. I moved here to start yet another fitness business and in 11 months since opening it’s going fantastically well!

It’s a group fitness, instructor lead, exercise program and we’ve grown to well over 200 members in our first 11 months. We’re already in talks with people wanting to invest in 2nd and 3rd locations.

However, this isn’t a story of an overnight success and a business growing incredibly fast in it’s first year. It’s actually a story 10+ years in the making.

I started as a personal trainer 11 years ago in a small gym in St. Albert, Alberta, Canada. A year later I opened CrossFit Edmonton and ran that for 4 years before moving back to Vancouver, Canada. I then started working with clients online and a year later AnthroPhysique was born. I even started a meal prep business in Vancouver called Fresh in your Fridge before moving to Mexico and starting this business, FitMix25.

The fun thing is that all of those businesses still exist today – I’ve moved on from some of them but I still feel like a proud father seeing them growing in the world.

The key though is that through my 11 years of business building I’ve failed, succeeded and learned a lot! However, since day 1 my dream has been to help more and more people live healthier lives. The physical form in which I’ve pursued that dream has changed over the years, but the dream itself is still the same.

I’ve been going after the same goal for 11 years!

Even though this example is around the growth of my businesses, the principle is fundamental to the pursuit of any goal.

The reality is time passes. There’s nothing we can do about that. The only thing we can control is what we do with our time.

If you have a goal, but do nothing to pursue it, I can guarantee your result: you WON’T reach it.

However, even though there will be setbacks, struggle, challenges, hard times and frustration, pursuing your goal is always worth it. It may take a long time to get there but so what?

The time will pass anyway.

~ Chad

Lost Motivation to Exercise? This is Why:

I was talking with my coaches the other day about ideas to help people get started. We got into talking about things like intro offers, New Years resolutions, bikini prep and wedding dress goals. I was saying how these are key times where lots of people use that motivation to get started, but it’s also where most people don’t stick to it.

I told my coaches that the reason people don’t stick to it is because the motivation they start with won’t last. It’s our jobs as coaches to help our clients continually find the motivation that keeps them going.

What I’ve learned over the years is that motivation doesn’t last. The things we wanted when we were younger, we don’t really want any more. The things we want now, we may want in the future.

This is either because our goals change, or we actually get the thing we wanted.

Let’s say I want a sweet car that’s lowered and has a loud stereo. (Cough cough, yes, I did want that when I was younger) However, this isn’t something I want today. I don’t want it anymore because I actually got a car like that at one point. I reached my goal.

The same is true with my motivation to exercise.

When I was younger, I wanted to gain more muscle and weight because I wanted to be huge. I thought it would be cool to walk around and be this big jacked dude. It was a key reason as to why I lifted weights, trained regularly and ate what I ate.

Today however, my body goals have changed. Today my goal is more about just staying healthy and my definition of fitness.

Another common one I see is the “wedding dress” goals. I’ve had plenty of clients that went strong for 3-6 months and achieved their goals for their wedding and fitting into their wedding dress.

Can you guess what happened after the wedding?

Unfortunately, many of them stopped training. They achieved their goal, never set a new one and lost motivation.

The point here is that it’s not uncommon and nor is it a bad thing to “lose your motivation”. In my experience it’s completely normal and part of the process.

They key is that you’re constantly adjusting your goals and adapting your motivation.

Trust me, the motivation you start with won’t last. But it doesn’t have to. It’s a continuous process of constantly re-assessing your self and your goals and finding a NEW motivation.

Being motivated to get started is important, but finding new motivation to keep you going is key!

~ Chad

How Many Miles Are Enough For Me?

What's the right mileage for you?

I want to stress that we are all individuals — in that vein there are no magic bullets, no quick fixes, no secret recipes to success. We all have a different training style that suits our body, personality and mental strength.

So a question I’m always asked is:

“How many miles are enough for me?”

 

What's the right mileage for you?

 

It’s a question that has been hotly debated for years! Should I train low mileage-high quality or high mileage-low quality?

To be honest the best answer is found somewhere in between.

In my mind the perfect training plan has you smartly increasing your mileage with a solid mix of high intensity and low intensity.

That’s why mileage is tricky…

Finding what works for you.

So how many miles should you run?

There are runners who are built to run 120 miles per week but there are also runners who can only handle 30 without coming up injured! Those 30 will need to be at a hard pace to make up for the lack of quantity but if done right those runners can still run incredible times.

In a perfect world where every runner is built the same and races happen in a vacuum. But it doesn’t…

I would argue that high mileage (done right) can lead to a bigger improvement than a more low mileage plan. This has to do with the improvements that only happen on a molecular level when you spend hour upon hours on your feet. (I would also argue that there is a mental toughness component that comes from taking yourself to the wall on your mileage training, but I will cover this in a later article.)

We all have a personal peak mileage and a personal peak race — it’s important to find out works best for you individually.

The Aerobic base

Authur Lydiard is the man who popularized building a big aerobic base before moving into more specific training. He coached a group of New Zealand runners, headed up by Peter Snell, that would go on to dominate the world stage. This is when a man by the name of Bill Bowerman brought Lydiard’s training philosophies back to the University of Oregon and the rest is history.

Think of the Lydiard system as a pyramid — the base of that pyramid being the amount of easy runs you put in. That base allows you build the rest of your pyramid, the bigger the base, the bigger the pyramid… hypothetically.

For years this “revolutionary” approach to distance running is how we coaches trained our athletes. Of course there was still a love for the old method that primarily relied on interval training multiples days a week… but the damage had been done and “periodized” training was here to stay.

In my own experience this can be modified a bit and if you’re more of a Jack Daniels (not that Jack Daniels) or Joe Vigil descendant like me than you would know that this philosophy isn’t the end all be all. I feel like the best set up for a training cycle is a steady diet of mileage, tempo runs, and mile pace work to build efficiency .

However, there is no denying that with just easy running alone and spending time on your feet then you will see a big benefit to your general aerobic system as well as:

increased bone density

increased capillary density

tendon development

improved Vo2 max

mitochondria recruitment

improved running economy

usage of fat as fuel

development of slow and medium twitch muscle fibers

mental clarity

mental strength

Mileage has it’s benefits but ultimately it comes down to what your body can handle. This depends a lot on your genetics but with the right amount of experience, trails and testing you can do a lot to optimize your performance.

Trial and error and research and obsess and learn and pass on to others…

So back to your question, “how many miles are enough for me?”

To be honest I don’t know — because I don’t know you, yet! However, I can tell you that more mileage is better than less and there’s no way of knowing until you get out there. With the right plan and progression you should be able to find your ideal mileage within a few weeks.

-Justin

If you have any questions or need help on your training journey, you can add me on snapchat, instagram or twitter — How can I help?