Is your Internal Voice Leading you to Success?

I listened to a podcast yesterday (link) and it triggered some thoughts for me. The topic of this episode was how our perspective dictates our results. Although it was business focused, of course I filter it through a fitness mindset and how it can be helpful to my clients and readers.

Listening to the podcast got me thinking about some of the conversations I’ve had with my clients about their internal talk. That voice that they hear every day telling them what they can or cannot do.

You see, whenever we start a fitness journey we all set this external goal we want to achieve. We want to lose x amount of pounds or inches. We want to fit into the dress or bikini. We want to tone our arms or waistline. We want to expose those abs that we’ve been told we have. The list goes on and on about all the things we want to achieve. Externally.

However, have you ever really looked at the internal thoughts that go along with those goals? If you say “I want to lose 10 pounds” out loud, what does the internal voice say immediately after? Is it supportive or protagonistic? Does it say “yes you can” or does it come up with 20 different ways you can’t? Continue reading “Is your Internal Voice Leading you to Success?”

Running Through It: Kellyn Taylor’s Breakthrough Marathon

I talk about NAZ Elite runner Kellyn Taylor’s recent Breakthrough at Grandma’s marathon on this week’s episode of my Podcast, Running Through It. She dropped 4 minutes off her marathon PR and 2 minutes off the course record. Kellyn’s Coach, Ben Rosario, is a friend of mine and one of my primary coaching mentors; so I asked him about Kellyn’s training. Continue reading “Running Through It: Kellyn Taylor’s Breakthrough Marathon”

How Many Miles Are Enough For Me?

What's the right mileage for you?

I want to stress that we are all individuals — in that vein there are no magic bullets, no quick fixes, no secret recipes to success. We all have a different training style that suits our body, personality and mental strength.

So a question I’m always asked is:

“How many miles are enough for me?”

 

What's the right mileage for you?

 

It’s a question that has been hotly debated for years! Should I train low mileage-high quality or high mileage-low quality?

To be honest the best answer is found somewhere in between.

In my mind the perfect training plan has you smartly increasing your mileage with a solid mix of high intensity and low intensity.

That’s why mileage is tricky…

Finding what works for you.

So how many miles should you run?

There are runners who are built to run 120 miles per week but there are also runners who can only handle 30 without coming up injured! Those 30 will need to be at a hard pace to make up for the lack of quantity but if done right those runners can still run incredible times.

In a perfect world where every runner is built the same and races happen in a vacuum. But it doesn’t…

I would argue that high mileage (done right) can lead to a bigger improvement than a more low mileage plan. This has to do with the improvements that only happen on a molecular level when you spend hour upon hours on your feet. (I would also argue that there is a mental toughness component that comes from taking yourself to the wall on your mileage training, but I will cover this in a later article.)

We all have a personal peak mileage and a personal peak race — it’s important to find out works best for you individually.

The Aerobic base

Authur Lydiard is the man who popularized building a big aerobic base before moving into more specific training. He coached a group of New Zealand runners, headed up by Peter Snell, that would go on to dominate the world stage. This is when a man by the name of Bill Bowerman brought Lydiard’s training philosophies back to the University of Oregon and the rest is history.

Think of the Lydiard system as a pyramid — the base of that pyramid being the amount of easy runs you put in. That base allows you build the rest of your pyramid, the bigger the base, the bigger the pyramid… hypothetically.

For years this “revolutionary” approach to distance running is how we coaches trained our athletes. Of course there was still a love for the old method that primarily relied on interval training multiples days a week… but the damage had been done and “periodized” training was here to stay.

In my own experience this can be modified a bit and if you’re more of a Jack Daniels (not that Jack Daniels) or Joe Vigil descendant like me than you would know that this philosophy isn’t the end all be all. I feel like the best set up for a training cycle is a steady diet of mileage, tempo runs, and mile pace work to build efficiency .

However, there is no denying that with just easy running alone and spending time on your feet then you will see a big benefit to your general aerobic system as well as:

increased bone density

increased capillary density

tendon development

improved Vo2 max

mitochondria recruitment

improved running economy

usage of fat as fuel

development of slow and medium twitch muscle fibers

mental clarity

mental strength

Mileage has it’s benefits but ultimately it comes down to what your body can handle. This depends a lot on your genetics but with the right amount of experience, trails and testing you can do a lot to optimize your performance.

Trial and error and research and obsess and learn and pass on to others…

So back to your question, “how many miles are enough for me?”

To be honest I don’t know — because I don’t know you, yet! However, I can tell you that more mileage is better than less and there’s no way of knowing until you get out there. With the right plan and progression you should be able to find your ideal mileage within a few weeks.

-Justin

If you have any questions or need help on your training journey, you can add me on snapchat, instagram or twitter — How can I help?

Getting started – it’s the only thing that matters

Getting Started - it's the only thing that matters

Getting started on something is usually the hardest part. I believe it’s the only thing that matters!

I actually wrote a similar version of this article about a year and a half ago but just realized I never got around to publishing it…

I apologize because I feel I prevented a learning opportunity for you.

I’m writing about it again now because I had a new realization about this concept the other day. I even did a Snapchat rant about it.

Continue reading “Getting started – it’s the only thing that matters”

Snapchat Coaching – Be a Beta Tester

Follow Chad on Snapchat

For the month of February, 2016, I am going to be offering Snapchat coaching to ANYONE that wants it!

What the heck is Snapchat coaching? Let me explain:

First, if you’re not sure what Snapchat is, you may not need to read on. However, if do know it and/or you want a personal coach for a month and are willing to learn new technology, then READ ON my friends!

As an online coach, I’m always looking at how I can best use technology to support my clients. I feel like Snapchat is really starting to take of in the “older” generations now. (25-45+) I also feel like there is a huge opportunity to be able to help someone in a way that other social platforms don’t provide.

To figure this out, I need to test it. To test it I need people. People means you!

For the month of February, I’ll do my best to answer every Snap you send me. Questions about your training, motivation, eating, supplements, ANYTHING. Consider it a one-on-one Q&A.

I say I’ll “do my best” because ONE: my current clients and business are my priority, TWO: I’m not sure how many people are going to take me up on this, THREE: I don’t know how many questions people are going to ask me. Regardless, I’m willing to give it a shot.

So here’s how to get started:

STEP 1: Add me on Snapchat – AnthroChad

Follow Chad on Snapchat

STEP 2: Watch my story every day for general updates about what’s going on and if I’m ever missing questions.

STEP 3: Send me your personal questions

STEP 4: Wait patiently for my answer. If I don’t answer with 6 hours, send it again!

I’m excited, I hope this works and I’m super pumped about how much we can possibly achieve in 1 month!

LET’S DO THIS!!

Chad

Do you even know why you are running?

Think back to your last run

How did it go?

What did it accomplish?

Did you log it?

Why did you run?

Think hard on that last question, most of us runners would have a hard time coming up with an answer – maybe you were just following your schedule or maybe you just thought, “a run sounds nice, lets do that.”

Perhaps you didn’t even think about it before hand, you just ran out the door ready to get that run out of the way!

I run into this mentality with my runners every year, there always comes a point in the season where they reach an impasse and start going through the motions. They might hammer an easy run or stop doing some of the little things we do post runs (I’ll cover these in another blog post soon) and if left unchecked they could start to unravel. I just make sure to remind them of what we are trying to accomplish, our easy runs are helping us recover and when we push too hard we aren’t accomplishing that goal.

That’s not to say that every easy run has that purpose but you – or your coach – need to have a firm understanding of your program.

Even if you don’t know what that particular run is doing for you on the molecular level – it still helps to know the reasoning behind it. Maybe you don’t need to know that the reason why we incorporate long runs into 5k training is because they help your body build bone density and help oxygen delivery to your muscles (those are just a few of the benefits) but you should still know that long runs will help build your endurance and help make 5ks seem easier.

In my experience just knowing why you are doing something can do miracles for motivation, not only on that run but throughout your program.

Does your program call for speedwork, do you know why?
Does your program call for speedwork, do you know why?

 

What if I’m not training for anything specific?

This is a good question because if you aren’t trying to train a specific system why should you care? – the more relevant question becomes:

What do you want out of this run?

Do you want to lose weight? Maybe you just want to feel better or maybe you use running as a stress relief and having that daily run keeps you from going insane.

Then THAT is why you run, and you need to write those words down and remind yourself before every run. Put that statement somewhere where you will see it everyday! When you start to feel the urge to stay inside ask yourself, “why am I running?” – This is how we succeed, this is how we make a lifestyle change!

And who knows, maybe down the line you will decide to train for a 5k. It’s an easy transition and just knowing how to set yourself up for success will put you miles ahead of your fellow beginners… literally and figuratively.

So… Why do you run?!

Let me know @anthrophysique – or leave a comment below!

Go Get After It!

-Justin

Accountability – how Gary Vaynerchuk got serious about his health

Accountabillity

One of my mentors: Gary Vaynerchuk recently figured out how to get serious about his health. It was all about accountability.

Sometimes I feel like I’ve talked about and written about this topic so much that I’m beating a dead horse. However, I just read another article that inspired me to hit the topic again.

I strongly believe that it’s the key to success so I’m going to continue to beat that horse till the message gets across!

The article I just read was by Gary Vaynerchuck and he posted it on Medium. I’ve been following Gary, his YouTube show, his books and all of his advice for years. He’s a very smart guy. So when he decided yesterday to write an article called “How I Finally Got Serious About My Health” I jumped on it! Continue reading “Accountability – how Gary Vaynerchuk got serious about his health”

What’s the BEST thing you can do for your health?

What's the BEST thing you can do for your health?

A while back I saw the below video on a friends Facebook page. It’s a very cool little video that talks about the single best thing you can do for your health. The great news is that it’s simple and accessible by anyone!

Even though I think it’s a great video, and has some great stats, I wonder how many people will watch it and say “D’uh!”.

Is it really new information to you that exercise is a good thing to be doing?

I don’t think it is. I actually believe that MOST people would easily tell you that exercise is the best thing you could do for your health.

So to me, the question isn’t what’s best for ones health, the questions is: if everyone knows it, why don’t we do it?

I encourage you to take the 9 minutes to watch the video and then answer MY question:

What’s the #1 thing that PREVENTS YOU from doing the BEST THING for can do for your health?

Knowing what exercise to do isn’t enough, here’s why:

what exercise is best

I’d bet good money that you’ve done at least one internet search for a workout program or nutrition plan to help you reach your goals.

Am I right?

You may have even found THIS article through such a search.

The good news is that this interwebs thing happens to hold a TON of information. A simple search should yield hundreds, if not thousands of websites with daily workouts, hundreds of recipes, nutrition plans, and other sites blogging about what you should be eating and/or not eating.

There are 2 major problems that come from this: Continue reading “Knowing what exercise to do isn’t enough, here’s why:”

Personal Training – Why it doesn’t last

personal training

In the last decade I’ve worked with clients in bootcamps, sport specific training camps, personal training, CrossFit, small and large group classes and remote coaching. With this experience, I now look at personal training in a new light, and better understand why it doesn’t last.

To me, personal training is a dependancy relationship between the client and trainer. Most people hire a trainer because they feel like they can’t work out on their own otherwise.  They need a trainer to push them or they won’t do anything.

Sound familiar?  Continue reading “Personal Training – Why it doesn’t last”

Fitness Tip: Get Real!

If you have kids you may have realized this a few weeks ago, but if you don’t, you may be like me and just realized this week:

HOLY CRAP IS SEPTEMBER!

September is a busy time of year for fitness because a lot of people start to “get back on track” after a summer of vacationing and indulgences. Have no fear though, we’re here to help!

My fitness tip this week is: Get Real!!

What I mean by this is to be realistic with your time. People tend to get excited when getting back into a routine and want to workout for 5+ hours a week. If you’ve taken the summer off, this is highly unrealistic.

Take a minute to look at your schedule, find the pockets of time you can actually commit to and work on making that happen. I’ll bet that even that will be a challenge.

Good luck!

Accountability – Support when you need it

Accountability defined is: subject to report or explain, answerable.

I like to start with the definition on some words to really connect with how I see this working in my life and in my business. Sometimes I find I use them a lot, but do I really understand them?

The reason I’m bringing this up is because a while ago I wrote a post about Why it’s SO EASY to fall OFF the fitness wagon  My goal as an online fitness coach is to help people stay ON the wagon. To do so, I keep them accountable to their goals and help them build habits.

In that post I discussed a few steps to help build habits. #3 was Accountability, so today I’m expanding on that point. 🙂

Building a habit means that you start to do something on a more regular basis. Typically you ARE NOT doing something and you’d like to do more of it. Exercise and healthy eating are pretty common examples here.

To get going you make a commitment and state “I’m going to start exercising more” or “I’m going to start eating healthy”. You focus on what you want to do more of.

If you’re smart, or you’ve listened to anyone giving out tips for setting goals, you’ll know that it’s a good idea TELL SOMEONE ELSE. You tell another person your goals to make it more real. To make you accountable.

Now that the other person knows, you are now answerable to them. You will now report in on your progress as you go.

A classic example of this is a “gym buddy”.

What’s great about accountability is that most people are pretty good at following through with something when another person knows about it. However, we aren’t so good when we are the only ones that know about it. We tend to let ourselves off the hook.

So, accountability is a great tool to help you build the habits.

Some days you’ll do the thing for you, others you’ll need that accountability to pull through. You’ll have someone to support you when you need it.

However, no matter what the reason for doing it (you or them), YOU are still the one that does it. You step up, you do the work, you push your goals forward.

You build the habit.

My question now is: what habits are you trying to build and do you have someone that can keep you accountable?

If you’d like, feel free to reach out to me on Twitter and let me know how I can help. I love keeping people accountable.

Also, I’ve recently started a Twitter Challenge using the hashtag #APLIfestyle. I’ve made it a public challenge to do something healthy and active every day. Personally I think the public social media realm can be a great source of accountability and is why I’m using it for my challenge.

Please let me know you’re thoughts on accountability and if you have any success stories you can share about it.

– Chad

Head Fitness Coach and Founder

Belief – how to succeed!

When I talk about belief, I’m specifically referring to the belief in yourself. Maybe “self belief” or “belief in self” is more accurate?

A belief is a feeling of being sure that something is true.

If I have a belief in myself, it’s a belief that I know something about me is true. Or, I believe that I have the ability to do something.

An example might be that I believe I am a creative person or I believe that I can workout 3 times a week on a regular basis.

The opposite of this might be doubt.

Applied to the context of fitness or nutrition; if I believe that I am the type of person that will follow through with my plans and goals, I’m probably more likely to succeed at them. The belief actually leads to the success!

If I have doubt in what I can do, it’s hard for me to get going and I likely fail.

When I start coaching with my clients, one of the first things we start to do is build their belief. Belief in themselves and what they can achieve. If they want long-term success they need to feel confident that they are the type of person that will be able to follow through.

How does one build this belief?

Great question! 🙂

As I’ve said in many other posts, like here and here, a big key to success is starting small. Set some small achievable goals so you can build a foundation of success. As you succeed, you feel better and better about your ability to re-produce that success.

The next step is knowing when to start adding complexity and how to progress, but I’ll talk more about that next week. For now we’ll stick to building the belief.

I see it time and time again where people have a great excitement towards their goals and want them NOW. They want the results as quickly as possible, so they start full steam ahead.

They go from working out less times than they can count on one hand over the past 3-6 months to going to the gym 5 days a week over night.

Ever done that?

Heck, even I’ve done that!

I had a couple months with a scarce workout routine and then when I got back on track I thought I could do everything I used to do 2 months earlier. Let’s just say it was tough to sit down for a few days…

Anyway, moving along…

The problem with this aggressive approach is that it sets us up for failure. By trying to take on too much and rush our results, we end up failing. Instead of building belief we build doubt. We don’t see that we can succeed so we doubt if it’s even possible.

If you jump into 5 days a week and only get 3 it feels like a failure. But if you start with 3 days a week and happen to get 4, that’s a HUGE victory!

So again, start small, get yourself some wins and enjoy the success. Setting yourself up for success will help you build the belief that you know you can do it. You’ll believe in yourself and your ability.

What is your self belief with fitness or nutrition? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments.

– Chad